Guide to the Henry Marie Brackenridge and Family Papers, 1816-1889 DAR.1937.03

ULS Archives & Special Collections

Summary Information

Repository
ULS Archives & Special Collections
Title
Henry Marie Brackenridge and Family Papers
Creator
Brackenridge family
Collection Number
DAR.1937.03
Date [inclusive]
1816-1889
Extent
1.67 linear feet  (4 boxes)
Abstract
Henry Marie Brackenridge, eldest son of Hugh Henry Brackenridge, was a prominent statesman and writer involved in the politics of South America, Mexico, Louisiana, Florida, and Pennsylvania. The collection mainly focuses on correspondence concerning Henry Marie Brackenridge's political career. It contains letters from notable politicians of his day including Andrew Jackson, Henry Clay, John Quincy Adams, and William Henry Harrison, among others. Also included are letters to and from Brackenridge's wife, Caroline, as well as other family and friends, which provide a context for traveling, health, and life at that time. Digital reproductions of this collection are available online.

Preferred Citation

Henry Marie Brackenridge and Family Papers, 1816-1889, DAR.1937.03, Darlington Collection, Archives & Special Collections, University of Pittsburgh Library System

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Biography

Henry Marie Brackenridge was born on May 11, 1786, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Brackenridge's varied career as a lawyer, judge and diplomat would take him to locations throughout the Western Hemisphere and led to contacts with many notable politicians of his day. Henry Marie's travels began early when his father, writer and judge, Hugh Henry Brackenridge, sent him to Louisiana to receive a French education. Taking after his father, Henry Marie pursued an education in law, eventually returning to his hometown to attend the Pittsburgh Academy. After gaining admittance to the bar in 1806, Brackenridge worked as a lawyer in Baltimore, Maryland; Somerset, Pennsylvania; and St. Louis, Missouri.

Brackenridge returned to Louisiana in 1811 as district attorney general for the Orleans Territory. When Louisiana entered the Union the following year, he helped shape the new state's legal code. During the War of 1812, Brackenridge provided intelligence to the Madison administration concerning developments in Louisiana. He later wrote a book on the subject, History of the Late War, between the United States and Great Britain, published in 1816.

In 1817, President James Monroe selected Brackenridge to participate in a fact-finding mission to South America, in order to report on the rebellious Spanish colonies. The Monroe administration hoped the mission would help decide the matter of whether or not to officially recognize any independent governments that should form after these conflicts. Brackenridge's resulting publication on the trip, Voyage of South America, Performed by Order of the American Government in the Years 1817 and 1818, expressed views largely in favor of the colonies establishing their independence. The work found an ardent supporter in Speaker of the House Henry Clay and explored ideas that are thought to have influenced what would later become known as the Monroe Doctrine.

Upon returning to the United States, Brackenridge was elected to the Maryland State Legislature. Along with another representative, he introduced a bill that would grant Jews the right to vote. The proposed legislation proved unpopular but revealed Brackenridge's belief in the importance of the separation between church and state.

A chance meeting with Andrew Jackson in 1821 led to Brackenridge's employment as the general's Spanish translator and secretary for a mission to the Florida territories. Through Jackson's influence, Brackenridge was appointed judge of West Florida. He presided over the region during its transition from a Spanish holding to a United States territory. In 1827, Brackenridge married Caroline Marie, a family friend whom he had known since childhood. The difficulties of frontier life and the potential for outbreaks of yellow fever kept the couple apart, with Caroline remaining in Pennsylvania while Brackenridge continued his tenure in Florida.

Following his dismissal as judge of West Florida in 1832, Brackenridge wrote a series of public letters criticizing the Jackson administration. Jackson responded, and the dispute continued in various newspaper editorials. Brackenridge argued that Jackson had replaced him with a political ally of the administration and accused the president of radically expanding the powers of the executive branch.

Brackenridge returned to Pennsylvania and settled into his wife's land near Pittsburgh, where the family established the towns of Natrona and Tarentum. In 1840, he was elected as a Whig to the United States Congress, replacing Richard Biddle. His attempt at re-nomination failed, but he was later elected to the Pennsylvania House of Representatives. Brackenridge continued to write and express his views until his death in 1871.

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Scope and Content Notes

The focal point of this collection is the professional career of Henry Marie Brackenridge. There are also letters and documents written by and pertaining to the Brackenridge family. While the collection contains some published documents, approximately sixty-five percent of the papers consist of handwritten correspondence with Brackenridge. Also represented are some of Caroline Marie Brackenridge's personal papers and correspondence.

Henry Marie Brackenridge's professional correspondence encompasses letters from various notable contemporaries, including John Quincy Adams, Andrew Jackson, Henry Clay, and William Henry Harrison. The letters relate to Brackenridge's various professional activities, which took him to South America, Florida, and Washington, D.C. Other discussions cover controversial topics of the day, including America's role in the colonial wars of South America, corruption in the Jackson administration, and the legal status of slavery in newly admitted American states.

The Brackenridge family correspondence incorporates a number of letters between Henry Marie and Caroline, detailing the difficulties of their long separations. Letters from other family members are also represented, including Henry Marie's son, Benjamin Morgan, his brother, Alexander Brackenridge, and sister, Cornelia Brackenridge. All of these letters relate to some aspect of the Brackenridge family. Typically the letters address the health and well being of friends and family members. Education, attire, and careers are topics also covered within the correspondence. Family members writing to Henry Marie, especially Cornelia, often chided him for his lack of timely response to their letters, as well as for his long absences from home.

Henry Marie Brackenridge's speeches and essays contain drafts of various writings with handwritten corrections. Also included are newspaper clippings of articles by Brackenridge, along with editorial notes written in the margins. Items of note include copies of several speeches Brackenridge delivered at various Independence Day celebrations and a review of Uncle Tom's Cabin.

Miscellaneous items consist of obituaries, legal papers and handwritten copies of literary works by other authors. Researchers may be interested to note that three of Brackenridge's memorandum books are included in this series. The books contain notes that were clearly used in his published works detailing his work in Florida and criticisms of Andrew Jackson.

The locations of the sender and recipient have been noted when possible. Item level scope and content notes are provided for each folder in Series I, II, and III. Jane Honeycutt's dissertation on the letters of Henry Marie and Hugh Henry Brackenridge provided useful information in the creation of the notes as did the initial cataloging by the Darlington Memorial Library staff. The original catalog cards have been included in the folders when available. For matters of convenience, Brackenridge's name has been abbreviated to H. M. Brackenridge at the series level.

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Arrangement

The order of these documents from the letter book has been noted through the inclusion of a letter book number (e.g. LB#01). See custodial history for more information. The collection is arranged into four series:

  • Series I. Henry Marie Brackenridge Professional Correspondence, 1817-1868
  • Series II. Brackenridge Family Correspondence, 1821-1857
  • Series III. Henry Marie Brackenridge Speeches and Essays, 1818-1864
  • Series IV. Miscellaneous Items, 1857-1889

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Administrative Information

Publication Information

ULS Archives & Special Collections, July 2007

University of Pittsburgh Library System
Archives & Special Collections
Website: library.pitt.edu/archives-special-collections
412-648-3232 (ASC) | 412-648-8190 (Hillman)
Contact Us: www.library.pitt.edu/ask-archivist

Revision Description

 Controlled access terms revised (dar) November 11, 2009

Access Restrictions

No restrictions.

Copyright

No copyright restrictions.

Custodial History

The first gift mainly consisted of letters between Brackenridge and his wife, Caroline Marie. In 1956, Mrs. Helen Brackenridge Painter gave the University of Pittsburgh a letter book containing Henry Marie's political correspondence. This second gift housed approximately 130 items. The letter book was taken apart in 1970 and placed into individual folders. The two acquisitions were combined in 2006 to provide improved access to this comprehensive collection. Some of the correspondence was originally contained in a letter book, which was disbound by the Darlington Memorial staff upon its acquisition. The order of these documents from the letter book has been noted by the inclusion of a letter book number (e.g. LB#01).

This collection was located in the Darlington Memorial Library in the University’s Cathedral of Learning until 2007 when it was moved to the ULS Archives Service Center for processing, storage, preservation and service. However, it remains in the custodianship of the ULS Special Collections Department.

Acquisition Information

The Darlington Memorial Library acquired the collection as gifts in 1937 and 1956.

Processing Information

This collection was processed by Crystal Hanna in June 2006 and Matthew Strauss in September 2006.

Existence and Location of Copies

Digital reproductions of this collection are available online.

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Related Materials

Related Materials

Hugh Henry Brackenridge and Andrew Watson Papers, 1790-1827, DAR.1937.04, Darlington Collection, Archives & Special Collections, University of Pittsburgh Library System

Papers of the Brackenridge Family, 1796-1963, MSS #160, Historical Society of Western Pennsylvania

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Controlled Access Headings

Family Name(s)

  • Brackenridge family

Geographic Name(s)

  • Brackenridge (Pa.)
  • Florida -- Politics and government -- 1821-1865
  • Louisiana -- Politics and government -- 1803-1865
  • Maryland -- Politics and government -- 1775-1865
  • Natrona (Pa.)
  • Pennsylvania -- Politics and government -- 1775-1865
  • Pensacola (Fla.)
  • Pittsburgh (Pa.)
  • Tarentum (Pa.)
  • United States -- History -- War of 1812
  • United States -- Politics and government -- 19th century
  • United States -- Territories and possessions

Personal Name(s)

  • Brackenridge, Benjamin Morgan
  • Brackenridge, Caroline Marie
  • Brackenridge, Cornelia
  • Brackenridge, H. H. (Hugh Henry), 1748-1816
  • Brackenridge, H. M. (Henry Marie), 1786-1871

Subject(s)

  • Diplomats -- South America
  • Judges -- Florida
  • Lawyers -- Pennsylvania
  • Lawyers -- Pennsylvania -- Pittsburgh
  • Missouri compromise

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Previous Citation

Henry Marie Brackenridge and Family Papers, 1816-1889, DAR.1937.03, Darlington Collection, Special Collections Department, University of Pittsburgh

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Bibliography

Honeycutt, Jane. "The Letters of H. M. and H. H. Brackenridge in the Pittsburgh Archives, 1796-1868." PhD diss., University of California Davis, 1986.

Keller, William F. The Nation’s Advocate: Henry Marie Brackenridge and Young America. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 1956.

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Collection Inventory

Series  I. Henry Marie Brackenridge, Professional Correspondence, 1817-1868 

Scope and Content Notes

The majority of the letters contained in this series were written to Henry Marie Brackenridge (H. M. Brackenridge). Most of the correspondence addressed to him conveys details of his professional career as secretary to a mission to South America, commissioner on the Mexican Claims Commission, judge in the territory of West Florida, U.S. Representative, and author. His book, Voyage of South America, Performed by Order of the American Government in the Years 1817 and 1818, is a recurring topic. The letters also discuss many of the historical events of the time such as the Missouri Compromise, Florida's transition from a Spanish holding to a US territory, Peru's fight for independence from Spain, and other political struggles in South America.

Arrangement

The letters are arranged in chronological order. The order of these documents from the letter book has been noted by the inclusion of a letter book number (e.g. LB#01). See custodial history for more information.

  BoxFolder
Walter Forward to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 90), September 24, 1816 11

Forward, writing from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, to Baltimore, Maryland, sends news of several people, including his brother Chauncey. Forward notes his lack of ambition and dissatisfaction with his work. 3 p. A.L.S.

Online
  Folder
James Ross to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 94), February 15, 1817 2

Ross, writing from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, to Baltimore, Maryland replies to H. M. Brackenridge concerning an edition of Modern Chivalry by Hugh Henry Brackenridge. 1 p. A.L.S.

Online
  Folder
Richard Rush to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 22), May 6, 1817 3

Rush, writing from Washington, D.C., encloses his pamphlet on jurisprudence. He reflects on the value of his friendship with the late Hugh Henry Brackenridge. 2 p. A.L.S.

Online
  Folder
Richard Rush to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 21), July 17, 1817 4

Rush, writing from Washington, D.C., relays James Monroe's desire to send H. M. Brackenridge to South America as secretary of a commission. 3 p. A.L.S.

Online
  Folder
E.S. Sergeant to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 13), July 22, 1817 5

Sergeant, writing from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to Baltimore, Maryland, discusses legal matters. 2 p. A.L.S.

Online
  Folder
John Graham to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 10), July 29, 1817 6

Writting from Washington, D.C., Graham describes preparations for the trip to South America. 2 p. A.L.S.

Online
  Folder
Richard Rush to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 117), July 30, 1817 7

From Washington, D.C, Rush covers matters related to H. M. Brackenridge's upcoming trip to South America. 2 p. A.L.S.

Online
  Folder
James Biddle to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 99), October 3, 1817 8

Biddle, writing from the U.S. Sloop, which traveled from Ontario, New York to Baltimore, Maryland, informs H. M. Brackenridge of the whereabouts of his provisions for the trip to South America. He also expresses regret at not being able to accompany the mission, as was originally planned. 1 p. A.L.S.

Online
  Folder
David Porter to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 32), October 26, 1817 9

Porter, writing from Washington, D.C., explains how his opinions on South America are similar to those of H. M. Brackenridge. He suggests that they meet to discuss these matters further. 3 p. A.L.S.

Online
  Folder
Henry Clay to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 120), August 4, 1818 10

Clay, writing from Lexington, Kentucky, to Wilmington, Delaware, makes note of his interest in the findings of the commission, of which H. M. Brackenridge was a member. Clay also reveals he published H. M. Brackenridge's letter from Buenos Aires, as he considered it something "proper for the public to see." 3 p. A.L.S.

Online
  Folder
Henry Clay to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 123), August 18, 1818 11

Clay, writing from Lexington, Kentucky, to Wilmington, Delaware, asks whether or not the commission has submitted a final report to the government. 2 p. A.L.S.

Online
  Folder
Abbé José Francisco Correa da Serra to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 85), October 12, 1818 12

Correa da Serra, writing from Washington, D.C., to Baltimore, Maryland, notes his desire to hire H.M. Brackenridge in a legal capacity. 1 p. A.L.S.

Online
  Folder
John Young to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 106), January 13, 1819 13

Young, writing from Greensburg, Pennsylvania, to Annapolis, Maryland, conveys his opposition to the "Jew Bill" before the Maryland legislature. The measure, which H.M. Brackenridge supports, aims to increase the rights of Maryland residents of the Jewish faith. 3 p. A.L.S.

Online
  Folder
H. M. Brackenridge to John Young (LB # 130), January 22, 1819 14

From Annapolis, Maryland, H.M. Brackenridge replies to Young's letter concerning the "Jew Bill." H.M. Brackenridge outlines his belief in the right to worship freely. He also offers his opinion on religion in South America. 3 p. A.L.S.

Online
  Folder
Caesar Augustus Rodney to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 50), April 4, 1819 15

Rodney, writing from Wilmington, Delaware, to Baltimore, Maryland, discusses H.M. Brackenridge's proposed book on the mission to South America. 1 p. A.L.S.

Online
  Folder
George Reinholdt to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 73), April 14, 1819 16

Reinholdt, writing from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to Baltimore, Maryland, wants to discuss the sale of land. He also gives assurances that he gave Mr. Sergeant the letter H.M. Brackenridge requested he courier. 2 p. A.L.S.

Online
  Folder
William Shaler to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 91), July 5, 1819 17

Shaler, writing from the U.S.S. Nanklin Gibraltar, states he is eagerly awaiting H.M. Brackenridge's book on the mission to South America. He also describes the various troubles concerning life at sea. 3 p. A.L.S.

Online
  Folder
Caesar Augustus Rodney to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 36), July 25, 1819 18

Rodney, writing from Wilmington, Delaware, to Baltimore, Maryland, praises H.M. Brackenridge's book. He suggests H.M. Brackenridge should consider becoming District Attorney of Baltimore. 2 p. A.L.S.

Online
  Folder
Peter Stephen DuPonceau to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 30), August 7, 1819 19

DuPonceau, writing from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, perhaps erroneously addresses this letter to "H.H. Brackenridge" (Hugh Henry Brackenridge). The letter reflects on H.M. Brackenridge's book on South America. 1 p. A.L.S.

Online
  Folder
William P. Brobson to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 16), August 14, 1819 20

Brobson, writing from Wilmington, Delaware, to Baltimore, Maryland, discusses South American affairs and H.M. Brackenridge's book. 2 p. A.L.S.

Online
  Folder
Henry Clay to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 86), August 28, 1819 21

Clay, writing from Lexington, Kentucky, to Baltimore, Maryland, outlines his thoughts about the independence movement in South America and H.M. Brackenridge's writings on the area. 2 p. A.L.S.

Online
  Folder
W. Pinkney Jr.to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 88), September 12, 1819 22

Pinkney, writing from Baltimore, Maryland, asks about assuming command of H.M. Brackenridge's military company. 1 p. A.L.S.

Online
  Folder
Stephen Pleasonton to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 33), October 27, 1819 23

Writing from Washington, D.C., to Baltimore, Maryland, Pleasonton thanks H.M. Brackenridge for some books that were sent to the President. 1 p. A.L.S.

Online
  Folder
David Hoffman to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 110), November 15, 1819 24

Hoffman, writing from Baltimore, Maryland, invites H.M. Brackenridge to join a literary group. He also includes a list of the other proposed members. 1 p. A.L.S.

Online
  Folder
James Parton to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 128), November 28, 1819 25

Parton, writing from New York City, New York, thanks H.M. Brackenridge for a letter of praise for one of his works. 3 p. A.L.S.

Online
  Folder
Henry Clay to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 122), March 7, 1820 26

Clay, writing from Washington, D.C., to Baltimore, Maryland, comments on Spain, Buenos Aires, and the Missouri Compromise. 1 p. A.L.S.

Online
  Folder
William T. Read to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 80), March 17, 1820 27

Read, writing from New Castle, Delaware, refutes criticisms of H.M. Brackenridge related to the mission to South America. 4 p. A.L.S.

Online
  Folder
Caesar Augustus Rodney to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 23), May 18, 1820 28

Rodney, writing from Wilmington, Delaware, to Baltimore, Maryland, compliments H.M. Brackenridge on his book about South America. He also comments on the political situation in South America and Henry Clay. 2 p. A.L.S.

Online
  Folder
Caesar Augustus Rodney to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 39), July 2, 1820 29

Rodney, writing from Wilmington, Delaware, to Baltimore, Maryland, notes his intent to visit Mr. [Thomas] Jefferson. 1 p. A.L.S.

Online
  Folder
Richard Rush to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 95), December 4, 1820 30

Rush, writing from London, England, praises H.M. Brackenridge's book. 3 p. A.L.S.

Online
  Folder
Thomas Hart Benton to H. M. Brackenridge (LB # 92), January 30, 1821 31

Writing from Washington, D.C., Benton discusses the admittance of Missouri to the Union. The letter also references efforts to establish relations with China, Japan, and the Indian Archipelago. 2 p. A.L.S.

Online
  Folder
John Scott to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 17), February 8, 1821 32

Scott, writing from Washington, D.C., outlines the legal implications of the Missouri Compromise. 3 p. A.L.S.

Online
  Folder
Thomas Hart Benton to H. M. Brackenridge (LB # 48), March 1, 1821 33

Writing from Washington, D.C., Benton asks H.M. Brackenridge to write some pieces in support of the resolution for the admission of Missouri into the Union. 2 p. A.L.S.

Online
  Folder
James C. Bronaugh to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 09), undated 34

H.M. Brackenridge received this letter in Pensacola, Florida. Only a partial letter exists, and it is not clear from where it was sent. Bronaugh writes of plans to visit Florida and congratulates H.M. Brackenridge on his appointment. 1 p. A.L.

Online
  Folder
Andrew Jackson to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 51), July 8, 1821 35

Jackson, writing from Manuels (state unknown), to Pensacola, Florida, discusses property records and a disagreement he had with "the Governor." 2 p. A.L.S.

Online
  Folder
G. W. Alvares to H. M. Brackenridge (LB # 105), October 14, 1821 36

Alvares, writing from Buenos Aires, to Baltimore, Maryland, describes the war in Peru for independence from Spain. The letter is written in Spanish. 3 p. A.L.S.

Online
  Folder
John Caldwell Calhoun to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 78), October 23, 1821 37

Writing from Washington, D.C., Calhoun comments on H.M. Brackenridge's book and the political direction of South America. 4 p. A.L.S.

Online
  Folder
James Gadsden to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 08), January 23, 1822 38

Gadsden, writing from Washington, D.C., to Pensacola, Florida, responds to a letter H.M. Brackenridge addressed to President Monroe concerning an attack on a civilian by an army officer in West Florida. 1 p. A.L.S.

Online
  Folder
John Quincy Adams to H. M. Brackenridge (LB # 79), June 11, 1822 39

John Quincy Adams, writing from Washington, D. C., to Pensacola, Florida, appoints H.M. Brackenridge as judge of West Florida. Also enclosed is a commission for Benjamin Robertson to become United States Marshal. 1 p. L.S.

Online
  Folder
William Sebree to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 72), February 6, 1823 40

Sebree, writing from Georgetown, Kentucky, to Pensacola, Florida, announces his appointment as United States Marshal for West Florida. 1 p. A.L.S.

Online
  Folder
H. M. Brackenridge letter draft (LB # 61), September 12, 1823 41

In this draft, H.M. Brackenridge requests descriptions of the South Carolina and Georgia coastlines, in order to compare them with those in Florida. The last part of draft seems to be missing. 4 p. unsigned

Online
  Folder
John Quincy Adams to H. M. Brackenridge (LB # 93), January 8, 1824 42

Adams, writing from Washington, D.C., to Pensacola, Florida, encloses H.M. Brackenridge's commission as Judge of West Florida and expresses regrets that it had been so long delayed. 1 p. L.S.

Online
  Folder
James Gadsden to H.M. Brackenridge (LB# 71), January 7, 1826 43

Gadsden, writing from Tallahassee, Florida, lays down his principles for the constitution of the Florida Institute of Agriculture, Antiquities and Science, which is referred to in the letter below. 2 p. A.L.S.

Online
  Folder
James Gadsden to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 104), January 12, 1826 44

Gadsden, writing from Tallahassee, Florida, to Pensacola, Florida, outlines the founding principles for the Florida Institute of Agriculture, Antiquities and Science. He mentions a second letter to be enclosed, which is located in Folder 43. 4 p. unsigned

Online
  Folder
Joseph M. White, to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 108), November 4, 1826 45

White, writing from St. Augustine, Florida, to Pensacola, Florida, asks for assistance with a proposed canal in Florida. 3 p. A.L.S.

Online
  Folder
Robert Mitchell to James H. Simpson (LB# 77), November 22, 1826 46

Mitchell, writing from Pensacola, Florida, introduces Simpson to H.M. Brackenridge. 1 p. A.L.S.

Online
  Folder
James Innerarity to Colin Mitchell (LB# 38), November 25, 1826 47

Innerarity, writing from Pensacola, Florida, introduces Mitchell to H.M. Brackenridge. 1 p. A.L.S.

Online
  Folder
James Innerarity to Robert Morison (LB# 53), November 25, 1826 48

Innerarity, writing from Pensacola, Florida, introduces Morison to H.M. Brackenridge. 1 p. A.L.S.

Online
  Folder
William Pope Duval to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 49), November 30, 1826 49

Duval, writing from Tallahassee, Florida, to Pensacola, Florida, claims he does not believe H.M. Brackenridge to be the author of a critical article on him that appeared in a newspaper. He invites H.M. Brackenridge to attend a land sale and wishes to secure some advice on matters relating to the territory. 2 p. A.L.S.

Online
  Folder
George Walton to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 43), December 11, 1826 50

Walton, written from Washington, D.C., to Tallahassee, Florida, appeals for help after being charged with stealing funds from the Florida treasury. 3 p. A.L.S.

Online
  Folder
William C. Magruder to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 87), December 21, 1826 51

Magruder, writing from Baltimore, Maryland, to Pensacola, Florida, praises H.M. Brackenridge's eulogy of Adams and Jefferson. 3 p. A.L.S.

Online
  Folder
Samuel R. Overton to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 56), January 28, 1827 52

Overton, writing from Pensacola, Florida, to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, discusses Florida politics and history. 3 p. A.L.S.

Online
  Folder
Samuel R. Overton to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 34), August 18, 1827 53

Overton, writing from Pensacola, Florida, to Tallahassee, Florida, describes his land in Florida and a recent illness. [Overton succumbed to Yellow Fever two weeks later]. 3 p. A.L.S.

Online
  Folder
John Marshall to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 45), November 19, 1827 54

Marshall, writing from Richmond, Virginia, to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, informs H.M. Brackenridge that the position of Reporter of the Supreme Court for the United States, for which he had applied, has been filled. 2p. A.L.S.

Online
  Folder
Joseph Story to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 47), November 28, 1827 55

Story, writing from Salem, Massachusetts, to Washington, D.C., replies to H.M. Brackenridge's inquiry regarding a vacancy in the office of reporter to the United States Supreme Court. Story notes the abundance of well-qualified applicants for the position. 1 p. A.L.S.

Online
  Folder
William Johnson to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 112), December 5, 1827 56

Johnson, writing from Charleston, South Carolina, to Washington, D.C., states that the position of Reporter of the United States Supreme Court has been filled by another candidate. 3 p. A.L.S.

Online
  Folder
James Clark to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 84), December 23, 1827 57

Clark, writing from Baltimore, Maryland, to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, looks forward to seeing H.M. Brackenridge, his cousin, in Baltimore. Clark also mentions visits he has arranged with mutual friends and family affairs. 3 p. A.L.S.

Online
  Folder
Edward Everett to Joseph M. White (LB# 89), April 23, 1828 58

Everett, writing from Washington, D.C., forwards payment for an article by H.M. Brackenridge published in the North American Review. [White was the Florida delegate to Congress.] 1 p. A.L.S.

Online
  Folder
James Innerarity to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 107), May 15, 1828 59

An invitation to H.M. Brackenridge for the wedding of Innerarity's daughter. 1 p. A.L.S.

Online
  Folder
Henry Clay to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 118), June 4, 1828 60

Clay, writing from Washington, D.C., to Pensacola, Florida, notifies H.M. Brackenridge of his appointment as federal judge of West Florida. 1 p. L.S.

Online
  Folder
Thomas Cooper to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 111), April 12, 1829 61

Cooper, writing from Columbus, South Carolina, to Pensacola, Florida, seeks advice about opening a school in Florida. 2 p. A.L.S.

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Duncan L. Clinch to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 12), undated 62

Clinch, writing to H.M. Brackenridge in Pensacola, Florida, requests a return letter from H.M. Brackenridge. 1 p. A.L.S.

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Duncan L. Clinch to James Clarke (LB# 98), May 20, 1829 63

Clinch's letter serves as an introduction for Clarke to H.M. Brackenridge. 2 p. A.L.S.

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Richard R. Keen to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 100), June 29, 1829 64

Keen, writing from Baltimore, Maryland, to Washington, D.C., expresses regret at missing a chance to meet with H.M. Brackenridge in Baltimore. He also requests information concerning land sales in Florida. 2 p. A.L.S.

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John Shoemaker Tyson to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 35), August 27, 1829 65

Tyson, writing from Baltimore, Maryland, to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, outlines changes he wishes to make to the soon-to-be published account of his speech on the "Jew Bill." The speech is part of an anthology H.M. Brackenridge intends to publish on the controversial legislation. Tyson also mentions Andrew Jackson's ill health and his criticisms of John C. Calhoun. 3 p. A.L.S.

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Peleg Sprague to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 101), September 18, 1830 66

Sprague, writing from Hollowell, Maine, to Pensacola, Florida, praises H.M. Brackenridge's recent publication on the "Jew Bill." 1 p. A.L.S.

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Edward Livingston to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 113), August 20, 1831 67

Livingston, writing from Montgomery Place, New York, expresses his pleasure with H.M. Brackenridge's approval of the President's Cabinet. He also praises the members for their qualifications and ability to work with one another. 1 p. A.L.S.

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Roger Brooke Taney to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 115), September 10, 1831 68

Taney, writing from Washington, D.C., thanks H.M. Brackenridge for his note of congratulations on appointment as Attorney General in President Jackson's cabinet. Taney also discusses the position and how he came to receive it. [Taney later became Chief Justice of the Supreme Court and wrote the decision for the Court in the Dred Scott case.] 3 p. A.L.S.

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Edward Livingston to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 109), September 30, 1831 69

Livingston, writing from Washington, D.C., refers to the state of affairs in Florida. Livingston discusses the "spirit of espionage" that, according to H.M. Brackenridge, prevailed in Florida. 3 p. A.L.S.

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H. M. Brackenridge to Andrew Jackson drafts, June-July 1832 21

Folders 01-03 incorporate a series of letters mostly addressed to Andrew Jackson. They seem to be drafts of public letters that were eventually published in various newspapers. They were written after H.M. Brackenridge lost his position as judge in West Florida, having been replaced by a political ally of the Jackson administration. The letters contain strong criticisms of the President and his policies. Also included are some of Jackson's replies (copied in H.M. Brackenridge's hand). [Refer to Honeycutt, "The Letters of H.M. and H.H. Brackenridge in the Pittsburgh Archives, 1796-1868", q E353.1 B65A4 1986.]

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H. M. Brackenridge to Andrew Jackson drafts, July 1832 2

A continuation of the series described above, this folder contains four more drafts of letters addressed to Jackson. They mostly criticize Jackson's actions in Florida.

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H. M. Brackenridge to Andrew Jackson drafts, July 1832 3

Four more drafts of letters addressed to Jackson along with one addressed to the voters of Allegheny County.

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H. M. Brackenridge to Levi Woodbury Draft, August 12, 1833 4

Writing from Tarentum, Pennsylvania, H.M. Brackenridge addresses concerns about land in Deer Point, Florida, that he sold to the Navy. [Woodbury was secretary of the Navy at the time.]

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Alexander Porter to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 31), January 31, 1834 5

Porter, writing from Washington, D.C., discusses the banking crisis and Porter's election to the United States Senate. 2 p. A.L.S.

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William Henry Harrison to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 44), February 2, 1836 6

Harrison, writing from Cincinnati, Ohio, to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, discusses a book that concerned a military campaign in which he was involved. He also comments on his presidential campaign. 3 p. A.L.S.

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Virgil David to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 75), March 11, 1836 7

David, writing from Lawrenceville, Pennsylvania, to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, requests a donation of books to the Lawrenceville Lyceum. 1 p. A.L.S.

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T. Baltzell to H. M. Brackenridge (LB # 103), September 6, 1836 8

Baltzell, writing from New York, to Tarentum, Pennsylvania, discusses affairs in Florida. 3 p. A.L.S.

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John B. Hearne to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 96), February 27, 1837 9

Hearne, writing from Chillicothe, Ohio, to Tarentum, Pennsylvania, mentions an edition of Hugh Henry Brackenridge's novel, Modern Chivalry. He also notes that he is looking forward to future writings by H.M. Brackenridge. 1 p. A.L.S.

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M. M. Wall to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 25), March 3, 1837 10

M.M. Wall, writing from New York, to Tarentum, Pennsylvania, references a publication of H.M. Brackenridge 's. 1 p. A.L.S.

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T. Baltzell to H. M. Brackenridge, September 12, 1837 11

Baltzell writes to H.M. Brackenridge at Tarentum, Pennsylvania about land sales. 3 p. A.L.S.

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H. Snyder, et al to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 28), July 21, 1838 12

Snyder, writing from Jefferson College at Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, to Tarentum, Pennsylvania, forwards an invitation to H.M. Brackenridge to address a meeting of the "Philo and Franklin Literary Societies" at the college. 1 p. A.L.S.

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Richard Biddle and Charles Naylor to H. M. Brackenridge (LB # 97), January 15, 1839 13

The authors, writing from Washington, D.C., to Tarentum, Pennsylvania, outline their thoughts on resolutions adopted by the citizens of East Deer Township, Pennsylvania. 2 p.

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William Elders to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 11), March 5, 1840 14

Elders, addressing this letter to Tarentum, Pennsylvania, requests H.M. Brackenridge to speak before the Wirt Institute. 4 p. A.L.S.

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R. H. Forrester, et al to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 29), March 6, 1840 15

The authors, writing from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, to Tarentum, Pennsylvania, forward an invitation to address the Wirt Institute. 2 p. A.L.S.

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Rufus S. Reed, et al to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 42), July 7, 1840 16

The authors, writing from Erie, Pennsylvania, to Tarentum, Pennsylvania, forward an invitation to a celebration at the Tippecanoe Club. The invitation is signed by Rufus S. Reed, Thomas H. Sill, John H. Walker, William M. Watts, Joseph M. Sterrett, Charles M. Kelso, A. Scoot, and S. H. Haskind. 2 p. A.L.S.

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Adam Gordon to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 81), July 14, 1840 17

Gordon, writing from Key West, Florida, to Tarentum, Pennsylvania, mentions H.M. Brackenridge's prospects as a candidate for Congress, and other upcoming elections. The letter also discusses conditions in Florida, particularly in Key West. He notes the need for a railroad and better control of banks. Gordon also states that the Seminole War has cut off communication with the mainland. 3 p. A.L.S.

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Adam Gordon to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 76), September 29, 1840 18

Gordon, writing from Key West, Florida, to Tarentum, Pennsylvania, remarks on the danger from the Seminoles and the coming presidential election, which he believes William Henry Harrison will win. 3 p. A.L.S.

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Stephen Duncan to H. M. Brackenridge, December 7, 1840 19

Duncan, writing from Natchez, Mississippi, to Tarentum, Pennsylvania, congratulates H.M. Brackenridge on his election to Congress. He also lobbies for H.M. Brackenridge's support on a resolution concerning economic relief for bondsmen that is before the House of Representatives. 2 p. A.L.S.

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John Baldwin to H. M. Brackenridge (LB # 62), August 23, 1841 20

Baldwin, writing from Washington, D.C., to Tarentum, Pennsylvania, notes Brackenridge's appointment to the Mexican Claims Commission. 2 p. A.L.S.

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Charles M. Dupuy to H. M. Brackenridge, September 24, 1841 21

Dupuy, writing from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to Washington, D.C., informs H.M. Brackenridge of a chaplaincy position that he had applied for twelve years earlier. He requests H.M. Brackenridge to present his application to President Tyler. 3 p. A.L.S.

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H. M. Brackenridge to George Haslet (LB # 46), December 15, 1841 22

H.M. Brackenridge, writing from Washington, D.C., to Tarentum, Pennsylvania, outlines concerns about his farm. 2 p. A.L.S.

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Frances and John Vance to H. M. Brackenridge, December 21, 1841 23

The Vances, writing from Tarentum, Pennsylvania, to Washington D.C., describe the activities of various people in the Tarentum area. They inform H.M. Brackenridge that their father sued Samuel Wolf and Jacob Staley for damaging his property. The second half of the letter is written to Benjamin Morgan. Frances asks Benjamin Morgan if he plans to return to school. 3 p. A.L.S.

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David Hoffman to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 68), February 9, 1842 24

Writing from Washington, D.C., Hoffman alludes to a claim apparently brought before the Mexican Claims Commission. 1 p. A.L.S.

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David Hoffman to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 02), undated 25

Hoffman, writing from Washington D.C., asks to see Governor Marcy's opinion on a report that was before the Mexican Claims Commission. 1 p. A.L.S.

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John Quincy Adams to H. M. Brackenridge (LB # 67), undated 26

A copy of a eulogy Adams gave for Lewis Williams, who was a congressman from North Carolina. 2 p.

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William O. Slade to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 40), April 10, 1842 27

In this brief letter, Slade formally apologizes for his conduct at a dinner at which H.M. Brackenridge was present. 1 p. A.L.S.

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James Kay Jr. to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 74), April 22, 1842 28

Kay, writing from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to Washington, D.C., reveals his plans for the publication of a book. He describes how the financial difficulties facing the country at the time have affected business. 2 p. A.L.S.

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Roger Brooke Taney to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 114), May 10, 1842 29

Taney, writing from Baltimore, Maryland, to Tarentum Pennsylvania, thanks H.M. Brackenridge for a copy of his "Essay on Trusts and Trustees." 1 p. A.L.S.

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Lewis J. Cist to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 26), October 5, 1842 30

Cist, writing from Cincinnati, Ohio, to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, mentions a package of autographed letters sent by H.M. Brackenridge. 1 p. A.L.S.

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William Darlington to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 27), September 16, 1843 31

Darlington, writing from West Chester, Pennsylvania, to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, forwards this letter along with a copy of Darlington's book, Reliquiae Baldwinianae, which has just been published. William Baldwin, the subject of the book, traveled with H.M. Brackenridge on his voyage to South America. 1 p. A.L.S.

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John Kelly to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 82), September 30, 1843 32

Kelly, writing from Allegheny City, to Tarentum, Pennsylvania, discusses local politics and his job as secretary of the Allegheny City Clay Club. 2 p. A.L.S.

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Henry Alexander Wise to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 37), January 29, 1844 33

Wise acknowledges a letter from H.M. Brackenridge and writes of a convention held between Mexico and the United States. 1 p. A.L.S.

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Aaron Leggett to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 57), April 2, 1844 34

Leggett, writing from Washington, D. C., to Tarentum, Pennsylvania, discusses the need for a settlement to a claim that was made against the Mexican government. 1 p. A.L.S.

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Henry Clay to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 121), June 18, 1844 35

Clay, writing from Ashland, Kentucky, to Tarentum, Pennsylvania, recounts a recent tour of the South. He also speaks favorably of his stay with Octavia Le Vert, a former pupil of H.M. Brackenridge's. 1 p. A.L.S.

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Cornelius Darragh to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 83), January 22, 1845 36

Darragh, writing from Washington, D.C., comments on a new edition of Modern Chivalry. He also discusses problems arising from the proposed annexation of Texas, regarding slavery and Congressional representation. [Darragh was a Pennsylvania representative in Congress and later became the State Attorney General.] 3 p. A.L.S.

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John Baldwin to H. M. Brackenridge, February 12, 1845 37

Baldwin, writing from Washington D.C., to Tarentum, Pennsylvania, focuses on the dispute over Mexico's quarterly payments to the United States. He also ponders the annexation of Texas and asks H.M. Brackenridge if he would serve on a proposed commission to Mexico. 2 p. A.L.S.

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H. M. Brackenridge to Thomas Mellon, March 27, 1849 38

H.M. Brackenridge's short note from Tarentum, Pennsylvania, concerns the rental of some houses "on the canal." 1 p. A.L.S.

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Octavia Walton LeVert to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 126), March 11, 1850 39

In this letter from Mobile, Alabama, LeVert reflects on her childhood during which H.M. Brackenridge was her tutor. 4 p. A.L.S.

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William Henry Litton Earle Bulwer to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 03), March 26, 1850 40

Bulwer, the British ambassador in Washington, D. C., thanks H.M. Brackenridge for a book and invites him to dinner. 1 p. A.L.S.

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George Robins Glidden to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 05), July 19, 1851 41

Writing From Sharpsburg, Pennsylvania, Glidden offers thanks for a letter H.M. Brackenridge published in a newspaper about him. Glidden, an ethnologist and lecturer on topics relating to Egyptian archaeology, also hopes H.M. Brackenridge will visit him so they can talk about archaeology. 4 p. A.L.S.

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H. M. Brackenridge to Peter Force, November 5, 1852 42

H.M. Brackenridge, writing from Tarentum, Pennsylvania, requests source material for a book he is researching. He expresses disdain for the current election and a controversy with Neville B. Craig. 2 p. A.L.S.

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William Makepeace Thackeray to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 04), February 19, 1853 43

Thackeray, writing from Washington, D.C., sends an acknowledgement of a note of praise from H.M. Brackenridge for one of his books. 1 p. A.L.S.

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F.S. Bradford to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 125), March 27, 1855 44

Bradford, writing on behalf of G.P. Putnam Co. in New York, New York, notifies H.M. Brackenridge that a letter of his had been misplaced. 1 p.

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Evert A. Duyckinck to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 124), March 31, 1855 45

Duyckinck, writing from New York City, New York, to Tarentum, Pennsylvania, mentions proposed articles to be written on H.M. Brackenridge and his father, Hugh Henry Brackenridge, for the Cyclopedia of American Literature. 4 p. A.L.S.

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H. M. Brackenridge to Brantz Mayer, February 1, 1857 46

H.M. Brackenridge, writing from Tarentum, Pennsylvania, discusses the antiquities and archaeology related to the Cibola Castles in South America. 4 p.

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H. M. Brackenridge to Brantz Mayer, March 11, 1857 47

Writing from Tarentum, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, H.M. Brackenridge requests more of Mayer's publications. He also describes a publication concerning American Indian history. 4 p.

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Alexander Humboldt to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 01), May 24, 1857 48

Humboldt, writing in French from Potsdam, New York, to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, reports on recent research on ancient civilizations of the southwest. 1 p. A.L.S.

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H. M. Brackenridge to Brantz Mayer, October 15, 1857 49

H.M. Brackenridge, writing in Tarentum, Pennsylvania, refers Mayer to several publications about the antiquities of the Midwest as well as Central and South America. He also asks for a second copy of Mayer's book. 5 p.

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Brantz Mayer to H. M. Brackenridge, October 21, 1857 50

Writing from Baltimore, Maryland, Mayer fills H.M. Brackenridge's request for a second copy of his publication on Aztec and Zapote architecture. He also welcomes H.M. Brackenridge's criticisms on the essay. 1 p. A.L.S.

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H. M. Brackenridge to Thomas Mellon, October 22, 1857 51

The letter, from Tarentum, Pennsylvania, concerns letters of administration for an estate. 1 p. A.L.S.

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H. M. Brackenridge to Brantz Mayer, October 27, 1857 52

From Tarentum, Pennsylvania, H.M. Brackenridge thanks Mayer for sending a copy of his book. H.M. Brackenridge relates his views on ancient Mexican history. 2 p.

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Ephraim George Squier to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 129), January 22, 1858 53

Squier, writing from New York, New York, discusses American Indian archaeological matters and various publications. 4 p. A.L.S.

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Peter Arrell Browne to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 127), January 23, 1858 54

Browne, writing from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, expects to receive a notice about Hugh Henry Brackenridge. 1 p. A.L.S.

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H. M. Brackenridge to Thomas Mellon, March 29, 1859 55

H.M. Brackenridge asserts he will help relay Mellon's views in his district. 1 p. A.L.S.

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Andrew Wylie to H. M. Brackenridge, February 2, 1868 56

Writing from Washington, D.C., Wylie reminisces about his friendship with H.M. Brackenridge. He also mentions preparations for a visit. 4 p. A.L.S.

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H. M. Brackenridge Letter Draft, undated 57

Only the last page of this letter is present. It concerns Central America. 1 p. A.L.S.

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H. M. Brackenridge to the "Pseudo-Democratic Party" draft, undated 58

This folder contains several drafts of letters addressed to the "Pseudo-Democratic" party. The letter outlines various criticisms of the Democratic Party. 20 p.

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H. M. Brackenridge to the Washington Gazette draft (LB # 06), undated 59

In this draft, H.M. Brackenridge responds to several critical articles that were published about him in various newspapers. 12 p.

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William Eichbaum to H. M. Brackenridge (LB# 60), undated 60

Eichbaum reports on recent scientific discoveries such as artificial stone and magnetic paint. 2 p. A.L.S.

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Return to Table of Contents »


Series  II. Brackenridge Family Correspondence, 1821-1857 

Scope and Content Notes

This series contains letters written by or sent to Brackenridge family members. The majority of the letters are written by H.M. Brackenridge to his wife, Caroline Marie Brackenridge, during long periods of separation. The letters make numerous references to their fluctuating moods and various illnesses, including depression. The letters dealing with Benjamin Morgan Brackenridge, H.M. Brackenridge's son, concern his education as well as his health. Much of the correspondence written to H.M. Brackenridge served to keep him informed of the activities of his family and friends while he traveled. There are also letters written by H.M. Brackenridge's sister, Cornelia and his brothers, Alexander and William. Cornelia's letters are particularly enlightening about social activities and include suggestions of suitable women for marriage. Represented as well are letters from cousins John Cabell and Robert Breckinridge. There are also letters written to Caroline and Benjamin Morgan Brackenridge from several of their friends. The letters are arranged into groups, according to family member. Letters between family members are grouped according to the writer.

Arrangement

The order of these documents from the letter book has been noted through the inclusion of a letter book number (e.g. LB#01). See custodial history for more information.

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Alexander Brackenridge to H. M. Brackenridge (LB # 52), October 23, 1818 31

Alexander, writing from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, to Baltimore, Maryland, discusses a new edition of Modern Chivalry. 3 p. A.L.S.

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Alexander Brackenridge to H. M. Brackenridge (LB # 66), January 8, 1827 2

Alexander, writing from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, to Baltimore, Maryland, speaks of family matters. He also praises H. M. Brackenridge's speech delivered about Thomas Jefferson and John Adams. 2 p. A.L.S.

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Benjamin Morgan Brackenridge to Samuel A. Rulon, May 5, 1841 3

Benjamin Morgan, writing from Tarentum, Pennsylvania, to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, describes a difficult trip across Pennsylvania, during which there was an accident going up an inclined plane. 2 p. A.L.S.

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Benjamin Morgan Brackenridge from Samuel A. Rulon, (LB# 59), December 24, 1843 4

Rulon, writing from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to Tarentum, Pennsylvania, shares news of mutual friends. Rulon mentions that the celebration of a friend's birthday lasted until 11 o'clock, a time he thought "was rather late hours for Quakers." 2 p. A.L.S.

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Benjamin Morgan Brackenridge to H. M. Brackenridge, July 5, 1849 5

Benjamin Morgan, writing from Niagara Falls, New York, to Tarentum, Pennsylvania, thanks his father for the money sent to him and describes the beauty of the falls and his adventures while there.

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Benjamin Morgan Brackenridge from Rachel C. Smith, (LB# 6), October 16, 1852 6

This letter was sent with a Bible from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 2 p. A.L.S.

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Benjamin Morgan Brackenridge from John W. Rulon, (LB# 7), December 18, 1852 7

Rulon, writing from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to Tarentum, Pennsylvania, relays the wishes of Benjamin Morgan's mother concerning her clothing and personal belongings. [The letter was written soon after Caroline's death in 1852.] 2 p. A.L.S.

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Benjamin Morgan Brackenridge to Phillipine Brackenridge, February 6, 1857 8

Writing during a stay in New York, New York, Benjamin Morgan recounts a recent illness and describes a ball which he attended. He offers his opinion on the clothing of others who were in attendance. 4 p. A.L.S.

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Caroline Brackenridge from Margaret Ann Overton, April 28, 1830 9

Margaret Ann Overton, writing from Pensacola, Florida, to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, speaks of efforts to raise money for a church. She also notes H. M. Brackenridge's return to Florida. 2 p. A.L.S.

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Caroline Brackenridge to H. M. Brackenridge, February 5, 1841 10

In this letter from May Pleasant, Pennsylvania, Caroline requests H. M. Brackenridge to send word about their impending trip to Washington, D.C. She complains of her weak nerves, lack of appetite and insomnia. She also fears that Benjamin Morgan might be contracting the measles from the children of the family with whom they are visiting. 1 p. A.L.S.

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Caroline Brackenridge to Mary Weaver, March 18, 1841 11

Caroline, writing from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to Freeport, Pennsylvania, apologizes for not previously sending a letter from Washington, D.C., as she was unable to make the journey. She relays that she has been sick most of the winter and that Morgan has the mumps. 2 p. A.L.S.

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Caroline Brackenridge to H. M. Brackenridge, October 12, 1841 12

Caroline, writing from Tarentum, Pennsylvania, to Washington, D.C., provides an update on domestic matters and informs H. M. Brackenridge of her travel plans. 2 p. A.L.S.

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Caroline Brackenridge from Mrs. M. L. Alexander, June 9, 1842 13

Alexander, writing from Washington, D.C., to Tarentum, Pennsylvania, offers news of a boarding house in which she and Caroline used to live. 4 p. A.L.S.

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Caroline Brackenridge from Lydia Burrough, 1842-1845 14

Burrough, writing from the Philadelphia area, to Tarentum, Pennsylvania, describes in this series of letters two of their mutual friends' deaths and the events leading up to them. She also details the condition of various family members and their travels around the East Coast.

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Caroline Brackenridge from A.B. and J. W. Rulon, September 27, 1843 15

The Rulons, writing from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to Tarentum, Pennsylvania, inform Caroline about a potential visit the following summer. 2 p. A.L.S.

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Caroline Brackenridge from R. Fletcher, 1843 16

Fletcher, writing from West Chester, Pennsylvania to Tarentum, Pennsylvania, speaks of a nephew who is planning to visit Caroline and her family. Fletcher also describes family matters and recent activities. 2 p. A.L.S.

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Caroline Brackenridge to Miss Louisa Weaver, April 13, 1846 17

Caroline, writing from Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, to Lancaster, Pennsylvania, offers an account of how her winter was spent. She spent four weeks in Philadelphia, prior to going to Harrisburg. 2 p. A.L.S.

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Cornelia Brackenridge to H. M. Brackenridge (LB # 55), November 24, 1816 18

Cornelia, writing from Carlisle, Pennsylvania, to Baltimore, Maryland, chides her brother for not writing. She also mentions various family friends. 2 p. A.L.S.

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Cornelia Brackenridge to H. M. Brackenridge (LB # 54), March 17, 1817 19

Cornelia, writing from Carlisle, Pennsylvania, to Baltimore, Maryland, mentions Miss Mary Hamilton, a woman she thinks H. M. Brackenridge should consider marrying. She also laments her lack of free time. 2 p. A.L.S.

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Cornelia Brackenridge to H. M. Brackenridge (LB # 69), May 30, 1817 20

Writing from Carlisle, Pennsylvania, to Baltimore, Maryland, Cornelia speaks of H. M. Brackenridge's book on the history of the War of 1812. She offers her opinion on H. M. Brackenridge's marital status. 2 p. A.L.S.

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Cornelia Brackenridge to H. M. Brackenridge (LB # 70), August 16, 1819 21

Writing from Carlisle, Pennsylvania, to Baltimore, Maryland, Cornelia expresses her wish to receive a visit from H. M. Brackenridge. Also provided are updates on friends and family. 2 p. A.L.S.

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Cornelia Brackenridge to H. M. Brackenridge (LB # 63), January 26, 1820 22

Cornelia, writing to Annapolis, Maryland, describes a trip to Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, where she stayed at the Governor's Mansion. She recounts a speech she heard their brother Alexander give. 2 p. A.L.S.

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Cornelia Brackenridge to H. M. Brackenridge (LB # 24), March 15, 1820 23

Cornelia, writing from Carlisle, Pennsylvania, to Baltimore, Maryland, discusses family matters and relays information about mutual friends. She also offers her opinion on two local women as potential wives for her brother. 2 p. A.L.S.

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Cornelia Brackenridge to H. M. Brackenridge (LB # 58), June 23, 1820 24

Cornelia, writing from Carlisle, Pennsylvania, to Baltimore, Maryland, speaks of being sick for several months and a visit to Mr. Ramsay's sulfur springs. 2 p. A.L.S.

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Cornelia Brackenridge to H. M. Brackenridge, May 18, 1821 25

Writing from Carlisle, Pennsylvania to Pensacola, Florida, Cornelia chastises her brother for not keeping in touch. She mentions Alexander's current interests in traveling. She also requests an update from H. M. Brackenridge concerning his travels. 2 p. A.L.S.

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H. M. Brackenridge to Benjamin Morgan Brackenridge (LB # 58), December 30, 1840 26

H. M. Brackenridge, writing from Washington D.C., to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, expresses the importance of learning the fundamentals of education. He also describes the state of fashion in the nation's capital. 2 p. A.L.S.

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H. M. Brackenridge to Benjamin Morgan Brackenridge, January 29, 1841 27

H. M. Brackenridge, writing from Washington D.C., to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, recounts different speakers he has heard in front of the House of Representatives, including Henry Clay and Daniel Webster. He also includes a math problem for his son to complete. 3 p. A.L.S.

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H. M. Brackenridge to Benjamin Morgan Brackenridge, February 5, 1841 28

H. M. Brackenridge writes to discourage a trip to visit Washington, D. C., which was planned for Benjamin Morgan and Caroline. He thinks the chaos of the city will be bad for Caroline's nerves. He also mentions a cabinet filled with stones he bought for his son. 2 p. A.L.S.

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H. M. Brackenridge to Caroline Brackenridge, January - July 1827 29

In this series of letters, mostly from Florida, H. M. Brackenridge notes his desire to be able to spend more time with Caroline. He includes some description of life in Florida, including a lengthy account of a local murder, and the death of a friend's young son. He also offers advice related to matters of health.

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H. M. Brackenridge to Caroline Brackenridge, August - November 1827 30

In this group of letters, H. M. Brackenridge describes the difficulties of living in Florida. Fever is rampant and has claimed several friends. He often expresses his desire to leave Florida, but admits reluctance to forfeit his position. Most of the letters were sent from various locations in Florida. Several were written during the arduous trip between Florida and Pennsylvania. Of much concern to H. M. Brackenridge is finding a boarding house where he and Caroline can find some privacy. Caroline's mental state is another recurring topic. H. M. Brackenridge worries about her aversion to meeting new people.

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H. M. Brackenridge to Caroline Brackenridge, January - June 1828 31

Some of these letters were sent during a sea voyage H. M. Brackenridge embarked upon during a return trip to Florida. The rest were written in various locations in Florida. Topics discussed in this series of correspondence include the sale of land in Florida, opinions on several acquaintances, and the strain of living far from Pennsylvania.

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H. M. Brackenridge to Caroline Brackenridge, July - December 1828 32

These letters were all sent from various locations in Florida. H. M. Brackenridge wrote of plans to return to Pennsylvania for the summer, the weather, and financial matters. He also mentions having written to Andrew Jackson concerning an appointment in Pittsburgh. The health of Caroline and Benjamin are recurring concerns in these letters.

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H. M. Brackenridge to Caroline Brackenridge, January - May 1829 33

H. M. Brackenridge wrote these letters from Florida. He describes plans for a house to be built along the Allegheny River, Benjamin's health problems, and his property in Florida.

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H. M. Brackenridge to Caroline Brackenridge, June - November 1829 34

These letters were written from a variety of locations during a trip to the north H. M. Brackenridge took via river boat. Several letters were sent from Washington, D.C., and convey his thoughts on corruption in the Jackson administration. H. M. Brackenridge suspects that several acquaintances had recently lost their positions to political allies of the administration and wonders if this fate awaits him as well. Also noted are H. M. Brackenridge's repeated attempts to meet with Jackson and the Secretary of the Navy.

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H. M. Brackenridge to Caroline Brackenridge, February - July 1830 35

This series of letters was written from Florida and is filled with references to various acquaintances, health concerns, and descriptions of life in Florida. H. M. Brackenridge often relates advice on how to properly raise Benjamin. Also described is the condition of the orange trees on his land.

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H. M. Brackenridge to Caroline Brackenridge, August - December 1830 36

H. M. Brackenridge sent these letters from several different towns in Florida. Included are updates on the construction of his house in Tarentum, thoughts on parenting, and preparations for a trip north.

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H. M. Brackenridge to Caroline Brackenridge, January - May 1831 37

H. M. Brackenridge wrote most of these letters during a trip from Florida to Pennsylvania. They discuss preparations for inhabiting the newly built house in Tarentum, Pennsylvania.

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H. M. Brackenridge to Caroline Brackenridge, June - December 1831 38

H. M. Brackenridge sent these letters from Florida, mainly from Pensacola. They cover real estate matters, concerns for the health of his family, and future plans.

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H. M. Brackenridge to Caroline Brackenridge, 1832-1835 39

In this collection of letters, H. M. Brackenridge discusses the termination of his position by Andrew Jackson and life in Tarentum, Pennsylvania.

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H. M. Brackenridge to Caroline Brackenridge, 1841-1843 40

These letters were written when H. M. Brackenridge was in Washington D.C., during his time as a U.S. representative. H. M. Brackenridge writes of life in Washington D.C., and his activities in Congress.

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H. M. Brackenridge to Henry Morgan and Cornelia C. Brackenridge, undated 41

H. M. Brackenridge explains to his grandchildren his wishes concerning the use of a spring on family land. H. M. Brackenridge also recounts a speech he gave on the occasion of the deaths of Thomas Jefferson and John Adams. 4 p. A.L.S.

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John Cabell Breckinridge to H. M. Brackenridge, December 1853 42

Breckinridge, writing from Washington, D.C., to Tarentum, Pennsylvania, mainly discusses their common ancestry. [ Vice President Breckinridge, in the Buchanan administration and a general in the Confederate army, was the grandson of Hugh Henry Brackenridge's brother.] 4 p. A.L.S.

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Robert Jefferson Breckinridge to H. M. Brackenridge (LB # 116), March 13, 1839 43

Breckenridge, writing from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to Tarentum, Pennsylvania, outlines a plan for a "civilized state in the tropiks" and another for "universal freedom." He also mentions the common origin of both of their families. 1 p. A.L.S.

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William H. Brackenridge to H. M. Brackenridge (LB # 41), May 13, 1819 44

William, writing from Indiana, Pennsylvania, to Baltimore, Maryland, informs H. M. Brackenridge that he will seek subscriptions for H. M. Brackenridge's projected history of South America. He also notes his dislike for politicians. 3 p. A.L.S.

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Series  III. Henry Marie Brackenridge Speeches and Essays, 1818-1864 

Scope and Content Notes

The secries of the collection contains a sample of H.M. Brackenridge's essays and speeches. H.M. Brackenridge was a prolific writer whose articles were printed in a number of different publications. The articles are a mix of book reviews, biographies, political essays, and travel accounts, which reflects H.M. Brackenridge's varied interests. Editorial notes are included in the margins, suggesting that H.M. Brackenridge continued to rework his writings after their publication. Many of the speeches were given in various towns in western Pennsylvania on the occasion of the 4th of July. The dated works in this collection cover a period of four decades, from 1818 to 1864, though some of the material is undated. The collection also contains some political essays and speeches commenting on his career and disagreeing with contemporary political movements. [Please note that folders 1-9 contain the various essays written by H.M. Brackenridge, and folders 10-17 contain his speeches.]

Arrangement

The order of these documents from the letter book has been noted through the inclusion of a letter book number (e.g. LB#01). See custodial history for more information.

  BoxFolder
Review of "Life of General Harrison", 1839 41

This folder contains some of H. M. Brackenridge's published works, along with comments written in the margins. Topics include the life of William Henry Harrison, the history of the Federalist party, and the political career of Martin Van Buren.

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"Uncle Tom's Cabin", 1852 2

Contains both a handwritten draft and a published version (in the form of a newspaper clipping) of H. M. Brackenridge's essay about the Harriet Beecher Stowe abolitionist novel.

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"A Remarkable Journey from Philadelphia in Twelve Days in 1832", undated 3

This travel account seems to have been intended as an appendix to one of the public letters addressed to Andrew Jackson after H. M. Brackenridge's dismissal as judge in Florida. It recounts a rushed trip H. M. Brackenridge embarked upon in order to attend a court date.

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"Examination into the Boundaries of Louisiana", undated 4

This essay provides both a detailed history of European settlement in Louisiana, as well as a geographical description of the area. 25 p.

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Newspaper Essay Clippings, undated 5

This is one of the editorials H. M. Brackenridge wrote concerning Andrew Jackson. H. M. Brackenridge's handwritten comments are also included.

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Review of Craig's History, undated 6

Newspaper clippings of several reviews H. M. Brackenridge wrote of Nelville Craig's book about the history of Pittsburgh.

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Review of "Florida Affairs", undated 7

Newspaper clippings of several editorials written by H. M. Brackenridge.

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Review of "Scenes of Childhood", undated 8

Contained within is a newspaper article detailing H. M. Brackenridge's childhood years.

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"The Independence of the Judiciary", undated 9

A lengthy draft, with editorial comments by H. M. Brackenridge written in the margins. Includes criticisms of the Jackson administration. 38 p.

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Speech on the Jew Bill, 1818 10

This is a copy of a speech given by H. M. Brackenridge to the Maryland House of Delegates. Also included is a copy of an exchange between H. M. Brackenridge and John Young on the topic. 7 p.

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Fourth of July Oration-- Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 1835 11

H. M. Brackenridge's speech focuses on the shortcomings of Andrew Jackson. Also included are his thoughts on the history of the Democratic and Federalist parties. 17 p.

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Fourth of July Oration-- Freeport, Pennsylvania, 1838 12

Handwritten copy of a speech given by H. M. Brackenridge. In the speech, H. M. Brackenridge recounted the founding of the United States and voiced criticisms of the current state of politics. 20 p.

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"Stump Speech", September 1840 13

Copy of a speech, with H. M. Brackenridge's corrections. The speech details economic problems and the rise of central banking in the United States. 14 p.

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Speech on the Treasury Note Bill, February 3, 1841 14

Printed copy of a speech given to the House of Representatives, explaining H. M. Brackenridge's dissatisfaction with the Treasury Note Bill. Though the country had serious financial troubles, H. M. Brackenridge thought the problems could be solved without the use of Treasury notes. 16 p.

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Fourth of July Oration-- Tarentum, Pennsylvania, 1844 15

In this speech, H. M. Brackenridge reflected upon the principles on which the United States was founded. He also described the history of the United States and Great Britain. 8 p.

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"Argument before the Supreme Court", October 8, 1849 16

Published account of H. M. Brackenridge's speech. The case revolved around the question of whether or not vacant land could be employed for public use. 22 p.

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"Protest of Henry Marie Brackenridge against the Bounty Tax", 1864 17

An essay on a tax concerning residents of Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. 1 p.

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Series  IV. Miscellaneous Items, 1857-1889 

Scope and Content Notes

The personal papers of H.M. Brackenridge are an assortment of documents including copies, presumably in his hand, of several literary works of popular authors (although one is dated after his death and may have been copied by another family member). The papers include obituary notices for H.M. Brackenridge and his daughter-in-law, Phillipine Brackenridge and guardianship papers for the children of Benjamin Morgan Brackenridge. This series also includes a clarinet that belonged to Brackenridge.

Arrangement

The order of these documents from the letter book has been noted through the inclusion of a letter book number (e.g. LB#01). See custodial history for more information.

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Case of H. M. Brackenridge vs. John Wineman, undated 18
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Guardianship Papers of Benjamin Morgan Brackenridge, December 1863 - February 1864 19
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Historical Society of Wisconsin Membership Certificate, June 30, 1857 20
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Memorandum Books, undated 21
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Obituary Notice for H. M. Brackenridge, 1871 22
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Receipt, undated 23
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H. M. Brackenridge's Translation of The Sick Prisoner, by Maroncelli, undated 24
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Obituary Notice for Phillipine Brackenridge, 1889 25
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Miscellany, A Scene from "William Tell" (LB# 65), March 26, 1872 26
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Miscellany, Threnody on the Death of a Child (LB# 64), undated 27
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Letter in German, 1854 28
Online
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Clarinet, undated 1

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